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October 2014

Are you working at your nominated place of employment?

This post is part of a series of fictional scenarios designed to help temporary skilled workers holding 457 visas and their sponsors to better understand their responsibilities and obligations. It is also designed to assist you in avoiding visa scams and fraudulent activity. The department takes allegations of fraud very seriously. There are significant penalties if you are caught engaging in fraudulent activity.

Working for your nominated sponsor240 x 320 - Construction

New Work and Holiday visa arrangement signed by Australia and Israel

Australia and Israel signed a reciprocal Work and Holiday visa (subclass 462) arrangement on 22 October 2014.

Soon young adults, aged 18–30 years, from Australia and Israel will be able to experience a once in a lifetime opportunity to play, work and study in each other’s country for up to 12 months. There will be 500 places on offer for each country per programme year.

Our website has detailed information about the Work and Holiday visa and its eligibility criteria.

Once a start date has been determined for this visa programme, eligible young adults from both countries will be able to apply for this visa. This process can take some time, however, we will announce the start date on our website and social media channels.

Interested in a working holiday in another country? Find out more about other working holiday arrangements overseas on our website.

Be invested— benefitting Australia through investment migration

The Australian Government announced changes to investor visas designed to enhance the attractiveness of investment migration in Australia on 14 October 2014. The announcement was made following a departmental review of the programme.

Significant Investor visas are a niche category of Australia’s skilled migration programme. They make substantial contributions to Australia’s economy, with more than AUD 2 billion injected into Australia’s economy since their inception in November 2012.

In order to be eligible for the Significant Investor visa, applicants must invest AUD 5 million into approved investments in Australia. Visa holders must then maintain their investment for at least four years in order to be eligible for permanent residency.

Are you working in your nominated position?

240 x 320 - Office WorkerThis post is part of a series of fictional scenarios designed to help temporary skilled workers holding 457 visas and their sponsors to better understand their responsibilities and obligations. It is also designed to assist you in avoiding visa scams and fraudulent activity. The department takes allegations of fraud very seriously. There are significant penalties if you are caught engaging in fraudulent activity.

Working in your nominated position

Beware of visa scams

Over the next few weeks, this blog will host a series of fictional scenarios designed to help temporary skilled workers holding 457 visas and their sponsors to better understand their responsibilities and obligations. This series is also designed to assist you in avoiding visa scams and fraudulent activity. The department takes allegations of fraud very seriously. There are significant penalties if you are caught engaging in fraudulent activity.

Visa Scams240 x 320 - Chef

Are you interested in Australia's 2015-16 permanent migration programme?

Every year, we set a migration programme to best support Australia’s economic and social goals. This year’s programme looks like this:

Visual guide to Migration Programme in 2014-15

To help set 2015-16’s programme, we have prepared a discussion paper, which is now online at www.immi.gov.au/pub-res/Pages/discussion-papers/overview.aspx?heading=the-2015-16-migration-programme. This discussion paper provides a broad starting point for thinking about the best settings for migration levels next year.

Migration agent fees and charges - part 2

You might have read our recent post on how much a migration agent should cost. This is the second part to our series and focuses on when you should pay your agent.

When should you pay your agent?

Some agents may ask you to pay in advance of services being provided, while others will charge when their services are complete.

If your agent asks you to pay in advance or takes money before completing all their services to you, your payment must go into the agent’s ‘clients’ account.’ This must be separate from their business operating accounts or personal bank accounts.  The only time an agent can use money from this account is when:

Migration agent fees and charges - part 1

How much should a migration agent cost?

If you have decided to use a migration agent registered with the Office of the Migration Agents Registration Authority (the Authority), you should find out in advance what fee they will charge you.

Registered migration agents can only charge you a fee that is fair and reasonable. You might notice that the fees charged by migration agents vary. This is because an agent’s fee depends on:

  • the type of visa you are applying for
  • the level of service you want
  • how complex your application is
  • the experience and qualifications of the agent. If your agent is a lawyer, a specialist, or has many years of experience, their fees might be higher.

You can find a table of average fees charged by registered migration agents for common visa types on the Authority’s website. See Agent fees